Archive for April, 2014

Strategy-based cognitive training has the potential to enhance cognitive performance and spill over to real-life benefit according to a data-driven perspective article by the Center for BrainHealth… Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Alzheimer’s Research UK has created a new social media app designed to simulate some of the symptoms experienced by people with dementia. FaceDementia – www.facedementia. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Seafood is rich in PUFAs, which have been shown to be beneficial for brain health. According to new research, not eating enough fish could increase the risk of cognitive decline. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Researchers from Loma Linda University in California found that laughter may reduce neuron damage caused by the ‘stress hormone’ cortisol, therefore improving memory in seniors. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Vanja Kljajevic, Peter Meyer, Carsten Holzmann, Martin Dyrba, Elisabeth Kasper, Arun L.W. Bokde, Andreas Fellgiebel, Thomas Meindl, Harald Hampel, Stefan Teipel, EDSD study group Abstract: Background: In this multicenter study, we investigated a possible association between the APOE ε4 allele and white matter (WM) integrity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).Methods: We analyzed fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) as indices of WM integrity in 70 AD patients (35 APOE Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Richard E. Kennedy, Gary R. Cutter, Lon S. Schneider Abstract: Background: The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 genotype has been recommended as a potential inclusion or exclusion criterion in targeted clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) resulting from AD, and has been implemented in trials of immunotherapeutic agents.Methods: We tested this recommendation with clinical trial Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By David Peterson, Caitlin Munger, Jared Crowley, Chris Corcoran, Carlos Cruchaga, Alison M. Goate, Maria C. Norton, Robert C. Green, Ronald G. Munger, John C.S. Breitner, Kathleen A. Welsh-Bohmer, Constantine Lyketsos, JoAnn Tschanz, John S.K. Kauwe, Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Abstract: Background: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the gene encoding the regulatory subunit of the protein phosphatase 2B (PPP3R1, rs1868402) and the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT, rs3785883) gene were recently associated with higher cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau levels in samples from the Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Regina M. Carney, Martin A. Kohli, Brian W. Kunkle, Adam C. Naj, John R. Gilbert, Stephan Züchner, Margaret A. Pericak-Vance Abstract: Background: The Arg406Trp (R406W) missense mutation in the microtubule-associated protein-tau gene (MAPT) is a known cause of early-onset dementia. Various dementia phenotypes have been described, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD), FTD with parkinsonism, and early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD)-like presentations.Methods: Using whole-exome capture with subsequent sequencing, we identified the R406W mutation Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Alina Solomon, Tiia Ngandu, Hilkka Soininen, M. Merja Hallikainen, Miia Kivipelto, Tiina Laatikainen Abstract: Background: We investigated dementia and Alzheimer disease (AD) diagnoses in three national registers in Finland: the Hospital Discharge Register (HDR), the Drug Reimbursement Register, and the Causes of Death Register (CDR).Methods: The Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) study was used as the gold standard. Participants were first Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Vincentius J.A. Verlinden, Jos N. van der Geest, Albert Hofman, M. Arfan Ikram Abstract: Background: With brain aging, cognition and gait deteriorate in several domains. However, the interrelationship between cognitive and gait domains remains unclear. We investigated the independent associations between cognitive and gait domains in a community-dwelling population.Methods: In the Rotterdam Study, 1232 participants underwent cognitive and gait assessment. Cognitive assessment included Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Renate R. Zilkens, Janine Duke, Barbara Horner, James B. Semmens, David G. Bruce Abstract: Background: The Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) first subsidized cholinesterase inhibitors (CEIs) for Alzheimer’s disease in 2001, introducing a novel therapy for a previously untreatable common condition. This study aims to determine Australian rates of CEI use and to assess equality of access to treatment based on socioeconomic status Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Nicole R. Phillips, James W. Simpkins, Rhonda K. Roby Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress have been associated with normal aging and are possibly implicated in the etiology of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). DNA deletions, as well as other alterations, can result from oxidative damage to nucleic acids. Many studies during the past two decades have investigated the Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Simone Lista, Francesco G. Garaci, Michael Ewers, Stefan Teipel, Henrik Zetterberg, Kaj Blennow, Harald Hampel Abstract: The development of validated, qualified, and standardized biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that allow for an early presymptomatic diagnosis and discrimination (classification) from other types of dementia and neurodegenerative diseases is warranted to accelerate the successful development of novel disease-modifying therapies. Here, we focus on the value of the Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Katherine A. Gifford, Dandan Liu, Zengqi Lu, Yorghos Tripodis, Nicole G. Cantwell, Joseph Palmisano, Neil Kowall, Angela L. Jefferson Abstract: Objective: The objective of this study was to compare whether different sources of cognitive complaint (i.e., subjective and informant) predict diagnostic conversion in nondemented older adults.Methods: Participants from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center had a baseline diagnosis of normal cognition (NC; n = 4414; mean age, 73 ± 8 Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Shoaib Afzal, Stig E. Bojesen, Børge G. Nordestgaard Abstract: Background: Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated as a risk factor for dementia in several cross-sectional studies. We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia in the general population.Methods: We measured baseline plasma 25(OH)D in Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Yu-Ling Chang, Christine Fennema-Notestine, Dominic Holland, Linda K. McEvoy, Nikki H. Stricker, David P. Salmon, Anders M. Dale, Mark W. Bondi, Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Abstract: Objective: To determine (1) whether age-standardized cognitive declines and brain morphometric change differ between Young-Old patients with Alzheimer’s disease (YOAD) and Very-Old patients with Alzheimer’s disease (VOAD), and (2) whether the apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype modifies these neuropsychological and morphometric changes.Methods: Baseline and 12-month follow-up neuropsychological and morphometric measures Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Claire F. Evans, Hayk Davtyan, Irina Petrushina, Armine Hovakimyan, Arpine Davtyan, Drew Hannaman, David H. Cribbs, Michael G. Agadjanyan, Anahit Ghochikyan Abstract: Background: Clinical trials with passive and active Alzheimer’s disease (AD) vaccines suggest that early interventions are needed for improvement of cognitive and/or functional performance in patients, providing impetus for the development of safe and immunologically potent active vaccines targeting amyloid β (Aβ). The AN-1792 trial has indicated that Aβ-specific Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Mercè Boada, Lluís Tárraga, Isabel Hernández, Sergi Valero, Montserrat Alegret, Agustín Ruiz, Oscar L. Lopez, James T. Becker, Fundació ACE Alzheimer Research Center and Memory Clinic Abstract: Objectives: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) affects people worldwide, and the prevalence is increasing as the population ages. There is an international effort to understand the biology of AD to develop primary and secondary prevention strategies, and to develop effective therapeutic interventions for individuals who are already symptomatic. One of the Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Hayk Davtyan, Anahit Ghochikyan, Irina Petrushina, Armine Hovakimyan, Arpine Davtyan, David H. Cribbs, Michael G. Agadjanyan Abstract: Background: As a prelude to clinical trials we have characterized B- and T-cell immune responses in macaques to AD vaccine candidates: AV-1955 and its slightly modified version, AV-1959 (with 3 additional promiscuous Th epitopes).Methods: T- and B-cell epitope mapping was performed using the ELISPOT assay and competition ELISA, respectively.Results: Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By David A. Drachman Abstract: The “amyloid hypothesis” has dominated Alzheimer research for more than 20 years, and proposes that amyloid is the toxic cause of neural/synaptic damage and dementia. If correct, decreasing the formation or removing amyloid should be therapeutic. Despite discrepancies in the proposed mechanism, and failed clinical trials, amyloid continues to be Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Mark Oremus The cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog) is the primary measure of cognitive change in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) drug trials. Conventional wisdom says at least a 4-point change in ADAS-cog score is clinically significant. Research articles (e.g., Matthews et al. , Farlow et al. ) and clinical practice Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Charlene Liggins, Heather M. Snyder, Nina Silverberg, Suzana Petanceska, Lorenzo M. Refolo, Laurie Ryan, Maria C. Carrillo Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a recognized international public health crisis. There is an urgent need for public and private funding agencies around the world to coordinate funding strategies and leverage existing resources to enhance and expand support of AD research. To capture and compare their existing investments in AD Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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A study of older adults at increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease shows that moderate physical activity may protect brain health and stave off shrinkage of the hippocampus – the brain region… Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Alzheimer’s disease is the first cause of dementia and affects some 400,000 people in Spain alone. However, no effective cure has yet been found. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Researchers at the University of Toronto say a sleep disorder that causes people to act out their dreams is the best current predictor of brain diseases like Parkinson’s and many other forms of… Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Researchers from NeuroPhage Pharmaceuticals, Inc. have engineered a series of molecules with the potential to treat most neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by misfolded proteins… Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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A new approach to handling agitation, aggression and other unwanted behaviors by people with dementia may help reduce the use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in this population, and… Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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A known precursor of Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment, has now been linked to early death in a study presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s Annual Meeting. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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New research from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine finds that the more years of education a person has, the better they may be able to recover from traumatic brain injury. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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