Archive for December, 2014

Today, fewer people are dying from ischemic heart disease and stroke in the United Kingdom, according to a new, comprehensive analysis of trend data from 188 countries. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Elderly people twice as likely as middle aged to be given these drugs despite greater risk of side effects. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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New UCLA research indicates that lost memories can be restored. The findings offer some hope for patients in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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A new study by researchers from UCLA claims lost memories may be restored by triggering regrowth of previously destroyed synaptic connections. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Researchers studied 414 people with severe dementia along with their carers in England, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and Sweden. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and is characterized by the formation of β-amyloid plaques throughout the brain. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is heritable with 20 genes showing genome-wide association in the International Genomics of Alzheimer’s Project (IGAP). To identify the biology underlying the disease, we extended these genetic data in a pathway analysis. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Synaptic dysfunction is an early event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis and directly related to cognitive impairment. Consequently, synaptic biomarkers may be valuable tools for both early diagnosis and disease stage. Neurogranin (Ng) is a postsynaptic protein involved in memory consolidation. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Scientists discover that a homing signal in the brain’s entorhinal region tells us not only which direction we face, but also which direction to turn so we reach our destination. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Signs of cognitive decline related to aging populations, and even the severe cognitive losses seen in Alzheimer’s disease and neurodegenerative disorders, may emerge many years earlier, according to… Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Yeast cells can sometimes reverse the protein misfolding and clumping associated with diseases such as Alzheimer’s, according to new research from the University of Arizona. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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When a large protein unfolds in transit through a cell, it slows down and can get stuck in traffic. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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The contribution of carotid atherosclerosis to incident dementia remains unclear. We examined the association between carotid plaques (CP) and common carotid intima media thickness (CCA-IMT) with incident dementia and its subtypes, and their added value for dementia risk prediction. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Healthy, elderly research participants who report being more sleepy and less rested have higher levels of amyloid deposition in regions of the brain that are affected in Alzheimer’s disease… Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Scientists are to explore whether drugs usually used to treat erectile problems by expanding blood vessels could become the next major way to tackle the dementia epidemic. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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The mass die-off of nerve cells in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease may largely occur because an entirely different class of brain cells, called microglia, begin to fall down on the job… Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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The mass die-off of nerve cells in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease may largely occur because an entirely different class of brain cells, called microglia, begin to fall down on the job… Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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New research has uncovered an association between having lower levels of oxygen while sleeping, less deep sleep and the development of brain lesions associated with dementia. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Genetic variants in DAT1, the gene encoding the dopamine transporter (DAT) protein, have been implicated in many brain disorders. In a recent case-control study of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a regulatory polymorphism in DAT1 showed a significant association with the clinical stages of dementia. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Panos Roussos, Pavel Katsel, Peter Fam, Weilun Tan, Dushyant P. Purohit, Vahram Haroutunian To elucidate the relationship between the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) risk variant, neuropathological lesions, alterations in gene and protein expression, and the severity of neuroinflammation. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More      

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By Robert C. Green, Kurt D. Christensen, L. Adrienne Cupples, Norman R. Relkin, Peter J. Whitehouse, Charmaine D.M. Royal, Thomas O. Obisesan, Robert Cook-Deegan, Erin P. Linnenbringer, Melissa Barber Butson, Grace-Ann Fasaye, Elana Levinson, J. Scott Roberts, REVEAL Study Group Conventional multisession genetic counseling is currently recommended when disclosing APOE genotype for the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in cognitively normal individuals. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More      

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By Hugo Lövheim, Jonathan Gilthorpe, Anders Johansson, Sture Eriksson, Göran Hallmans, Fredrik Elgh Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is thought to play an etiological role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Mary T. Newport, Theodore B. VanItallie, Yoshihiro Kashiwaya, Michael Todd King, Richard L. Veech Providing ketone bodies to the brain can bypass metabolic blocks to glucose utilization and improve function in energy-starved neurons. For this, plasma ketones must be elevated well above the ≤0.2 mM default concentrations normally prevalent. Limitations of dietary methods currently used to produce therapeutic hyperketonemia have stimulated the search for better Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Christian Benedict, Liisa Byberg, Jonathan Cedernaes, Pleunie S. Hogenkamp, Vilmantas Giedratis, Lena Kilander, Lars Lind, Lars Lannfelt, Helgi B. Schiöth To study the association between self-reported sleep disturbances and dementia risk. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By William E. Klunk, Robert A. Koeppe, Julie C. Price, Tammie L. Benzinger, Michael D. Devous, William J. Jagust, Keith A. Johnson, Chester A. Mathis, Davneet Minhas, Michael J. Pontecorvo, Christopher C. Rowe, Daniel M. Skovronsky, Mark A. Mintun Although amyloid imaging with PiB-PET ([C-11]Pittsburgh Compound-B positron emission tomography), and now with F-18-labeled tracers, has produced remarkably consistent qualitative findings across a large number of centers, there has been considerable variability in the exact numbers reported as quantitative outcome measures of tracer retention. In some cases this is as Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Why a woodpecker?"> Why a woodpecker?

Posted December 9, 2014 By

By Ara S. Khachaturian The selection of this month’s cover image is that of the North American woodpecker. Although the selection process briefly considered the Cape gannet and the bighorn sheep, the woodpecker emerged as the important and enduring subject of interest among scientists, clinicians, and engineers studying concussion and brain injury. Perhaps, a Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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By Michelle M. Mielke, Stephen D. Weigand, Heather J. Wiste, Prashanthi Vemuri, Mary M. Machulda, Davis S. Knopman, Val Lowe, Rosebud O. Roberts, Kejal Kantarci, Walter A. Rocca, Clifford R. Jack, Ronald C. Petersen Inexpensive, non-invasive tools for assessing Alzheimer-type pathophysiologies are needed. Computerized cognitive assessments are prime candidates. Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Editorial"> Editorial

Posted December 9, 2014 By

By Ara S. Khachaturian The editors of Alzheimer’s & Dementia thank the reviewers, the authors, the research participants, and the readers for their respected contributions, enduring support, and continued interest in the Journal. After completing ten volumes, the Journal remains among the highest ranked journals in the category of clinical neurology. The tables below Read & Research Alzheimer’s More

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Contents"> Contents

Posted December 9, 2014 By

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